Self-Realization through Yoga Meditation of the Yoga Sutras, the contemplative insight of Advaita Vedanta, and the intense devotion of Samaya Sri Vidya Tantra

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Yoga Sutras 4.32-4.34: 
Gunas and Liberation
or Kaivalya
(Previous Beginning Main)

Click here to return to the main page of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.Gunas recede into their cause: Also resulting from that dharma-meghah samadhi (4.29), the three primary elements or gunas (4.13-4.14) will have fulfilled their purpose, cease to transform into further transformations, and recede back into their essence. (4.32)

Breaking the pattern of time, space, and causation: The sequencing process of moments and impressions corresponds to the moments of time, and is apprehended at the end point of the sequence. (4.33)

Consciousness in its true nature: When the primary elements (gunas) involve, or resolve themselves back into that out of which they emerged, there comes liberation, wherein the power of pure consciousness (purusha) becomes established in its true nature. (4.34)

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4.32 Also resulting from that dharma-meghah samadhi (4.29), the three primary elements or gunas (4.13-4.14) will have fulfilled their purpose, cease to transform into further transformations, and recede back into their essence.
(tatah kritarthanam parinama krama samaptih gunanam)

  • tatah = then, by that
  • krita = fulfilled
  • arthanam = purpose
  • parinama = transition, transformation, of change, result, consequence, mutative effect, alteration (2.15, 3.9-3.16)
  • krama = sequence, succession, order (3.15)
  • samaptih = terminate, end
  • gunanam = elements, prime qualities, constituents, attributes; (three gunas of sattvas, rajas, tamas)

The gunas cease transformations: Also resulting from the dharma-meghah samadhi (4.29), the three primary elements or gunas (4.13-4.14) will have fulfilled their purpose, cease to transform into further transformations, and recede back into their essence.

Discarding the cause for pain: The interplay of the three gunas were earlier seen to be the cause for pain (2.15), and sadhana was done so as to discard this pain before it comes (2.16).

The end of the transitions: The coming of the dharma-meghah samadhi also brings to an end the need for the three subtle transitions previously discussed (3.9-3.16).

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4.33 The sequencing process of moments and impressions corresponds to the moments of time, and is apprehended at the end point of the sequence.
(ksana pratiyogi parinama aparanta nigrahyah kramah)

  • ksana = moments
  • pratiyogi = uninterrupted succession
  • parinama = transition, transformation, of change, result, consequence, mutative effect, alteration
  • aparanta = end point, at the end
  • nigrahyah = recognizable, apprehensible, comprehensible
  • kramah = succession, process, course, order, series

Time, frames, and movies: We are all familiar with the phrases "beginning of time" and "end of time." Here, in this sutra, time is being described as the uninterrupted sequence or order of the many impressions in the field of mind. It is this sequencing that brings the appearance of time. Think of a reel of movie film. You can hold it, and all of the frames in your hand, at one moment of time, and yet, when you play the movie through a projector, you create the appearance of time. It is because of the sequencing of the frames, one after the other, that there appears to be time.

Experience is at the end of the sequence: The "Aha!" moment of understanding a sequence of moments, impressions, or frames comes at the end of the sequence. Recall that great emphasis is placed on these transition moments in sutras (3.9-3.16). When you can see these moments at the end of the sequence, you come to understand the transformation process itself, and can see beyond the avidya or ignorance (2.5) that veils (1.4) the true self (1.3). 

Break the pattern of sequencing to transcend time: Most of the time, we are caught up in time, identified with those thought patterns (1.4), whether gross or subtle in nature. Now, in these last few sutras, all of those patterns have been reduced to their primal reality, that of the three gunas. If you break the identity with the patterns, and the sequencing process, then you break the process of time, space, and causation.

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4.34 When those primary elements involve, or resolve themselves back into that out of which they emerged, there comes liberation, wherein the power of pure consciousness becomes established in its true nature.
(purusha artha sunyanam gunanam pratiprasavah kaivalyam svarupa pratistha va chiti shaktih iti)

  • purusha = pure consciousness, Self
  • artha = purpose, meaning
  • sunyanam = devoid
  • gunanam = elements, prime qualities, constituents, attributes; (three gunas of sattvas, rajas, tamas)
  • pratiprasavah = involution, resolve, recede
  • kaivalyam = absolute freedom, liberation, enlightenment (2.25)
  • svarupa = own form
  • pratistha = established
  • va = or
  • chiti = consciousness
  • shaktih = power
  • iti = the end, finis (to denote the end of the teachings)

When the gunas involve, liberation is realized: When those primary elements or gunas (4.32) involve, or resolve themselves back into that out of which they emerged, there comes liberation, wherein the power of pure consciousness (purusha) becomes established in its true nature (1.3).

The enlightened Yogi: Such an enlightened Yogi is purely spontaneous, with no actions whatsoever being motivated by the inner drives of samskaras and karma. One hundred percent of actions are from the here-and-now response to the needs of the moment, in relation to the service of other beings. This is easy for such a yogi, as there is no I and no other; it is all a constant flow of pure, undivided consciousness (purusha), that only seems to play, here, there, and everywhere.

 

This is the end of the Yoga Sutras

OM Tat Sat

OM, That alone is real.

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This site is devoted to presenting the ancient Self-Realization path of the Tradition of the Himalayan masters in simple, understandable and beneficial ways, while not compromising quality or depth. The goal of our sadhana or practices is the highest Joy that comes from the Realization in direct experience of the center of consciousness, the Self, the Atman or Purusha, which is one and the same with the Absolute Reality. This Self-Realization comes through Yoga meditation of the Yoga Sutras, the contemplative insight of Advaita Vedanta, and the intense devotion of Samaya Sri Vidya Tantra, the three of which complement one another like fingers on a hand. We employ the classical approaches of Raja, Jnana, Karma, and Bhakti Yoga, as well as Hatha, Kriya, Kundalini, Laya, Mantra, Nada, Siddha, and Tantra Yoga. Meditation, contemplation, mantra and prayer finally converge into a unified force directed towards the final stage, piercing the pearl of wisdom called bindu, leading to the Absolute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Yoga Nidra Meditation CD by Swami Jnaneshvara
Yoga Nidra CD
Swami Jnaneshvara